perks-of-being-chinese
w4t3vr:

sexclaimes:

thatdoesntcomeoffyouknow:

sexclaimes:

First tattoo and couldn’t be happier.

On your hand. Wow ok. You’re so edgy and cool.
.. Not

You’re right. I did not this so I can be “edgy and cool”. I got this tattoo because I wanted to commemorate my best friend who died in a car accident 5 years ago. “Promise” was a word that we would say to one another. I chose my pinky because when we were younger we would always do the pinky promise thing.
So no, I don’t think I’m edgy or cool. What I think is that you should be respectful to other people before you fire off a dumb comment.

THIS POST IS EVERYTHING

w4t3vr:

sexclaimes:

thatdoesntcomeoffyouknow:

sexclaimes:

First tattoo and couldn’t be happier.

On your hand. Wow ok. You’re so edgy and cool.

.. Not

You’re right. I did not this so I can be “edgy and cool”. I got this tattoo because I wanted to commemorate my best friend who died in a car accident 5 years ago. “Promise” was a word that we would say to one another. I chose my pinky because when we were younger we would always do the pinky promise thing.

So no, I don’t think I’m edgy or cool. What I think is that you should be respectful to other people before you fire off a dumb comment.

THIS POST IS EVERYTHING

deansass

Anonymous asked:

OH MY FUCKIN GOD I JUST SAVED MYSELF CAUSE MY MOM WANTED TO LOOK THROUGH MY TUMBLR WITHOUT MY PERMISSION AND I CAME HOME FROM SCHOOL IDK HOW SHE EVEN GOT INTO MY ACCOUNT AND SHE'S ALL LIKE: WHO IS THIS DEANS ASS? AND I'M LIKE: SASS! CAUSE I DIDN'T KNOW IF IT WAS DEANS ASS OR DEAN SASS AND I HAD A HEART ATTACK OH MY GOD

deansass answered:

MY URL CAN BE A LIFE SAVER OR A LIFE RUINER

GLAD YOU PLAYED IT OUT WELL

nebranska

anomalously-written:

[via[Advice from Jody Hedlund]

1. Develop our character before picking the name.
I fill out my character worksheet and get to know as much about my character as possible before deciding on a name. As I develop the character’s personality, ethnicity, quirks, life-experiences, etc., I’m able to narrow down names that might match that person. For example, in The Doctor’s Lady, my heroine is a well-educated, pious lady from a wealthy family. I chose the name Priscilla because it has a more refined and elegant ring than a name like Mary or Betty. 

2. Find names that match our setting and fit with the plot. 
Once my character is starting to come to life, I also evaluate how that character fits within the plot and setting. In my current WIP, which is set in the lumber communities of central Michigan, I sorted through rural names, as well as logging era names. And I tried to think which ones would fit within the tone of the plot.

3. Use time-period appropriate names.
This is especially critical for historical writers. I generally pull up the list of the most popular names for the year or decade in which my character was born. I also look at lists of names in biographies and research books for the particular time period of my book. In the 1600’s, 29% of men were named John (that’s about 1 out of 3 men!) and 15% of women were named Elizabeth. Thus, in The Preacher’s Bride I felt almost obligated to name my MC’s John and Elizabeth. Not really! But you get my point. 

4. Use symbolism if possible.
While we can’t always attach symbolism to names, we can look for ways to give special meaning to some of the names we choose. In my WIP, I looked at the meaning of hero names before choosing one. Whether the reader ever realizes it or not, part of my hero’s character arc is about him learning to live up to his name—which means “strong as a wolf.”

5. Avoid picking names that readers will have a difficult time saying.
I get annoyed when I read character names I can’t pronounce—oddly-spelled or too-long names. This is even more frustrating when the name belongs to the MC and I have to read the “weird” name ten times per page. I suggest avoiding names (as fun and nice as they might be) that might trip up our readers. We should also limit the number of foreign names for the same reason.

6. Avoid having names that start with the same letter or sound. 
I keep a running list of every character that crops up in my book—a sheet I can easily scan. I do my best to start each name with a different letter. I don’t want to have a John, Joseph, and Jacob all in the same book. Or a Polly and Molly. When names are too similar, we have to make our readers work harder to remember our characters. And our job as writers is to make the reading experience as smooth and pleasant as possible.

7. Remember, unique doesn’t always mean better.
Sometimes when names are too unique they can distract a reader from the story. I like unique last names, especially when they’re real (like Goodenough or Covenant). But often those kinds of names have a ring of disbelief. When I get too carried away, my editors send me back to the drawing board for a simpler name (as they did with the two examples I mentioned!). 

8. Make sure our minor character names don’t overshadow our main characters. 
It’s fun to find especially dark and sinister names for our antagonists. In The Doctor’s Lady, one of the bad guys is named Black Squire. He’s a rugged fur trapper that wears a black eye patch. The name fits. But, we have to make sure we don’t spend more time crafting the perfect names for lesser characters so that they become more vibrant and alive than the MC’s.

obsessedwith-dean-castiel-sam

obsessedwith-castiel-dean-sam:

deans-avenging-angel:

obsessedwith-castiel-dean-sam:

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Did you ever notice how much Dean talks about or references tacos?

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and like tacos are made with tortillas so…image

ARE YOU TRYING TO SAY DEAN IS GOD

Well no that wasn’t what I was saying, but now that you mention it I DO worship him and Dean Winchester IS God-like perfection so I guess you could say that but I was just talking about tacos lol